Relationships
Follow
Find tag "neurology"
2.8K views | +6 today
Relationships
Resources for creating great romantic and familial relationships curated by Marriage and Family Therapist, Dr. Amy Fuller
Curated by Dr. Amy Fuller
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dr. Amy Fuller
Scoop.it!

Christine Carter: How to Stay Calm During a Fight | Greater Good

Christine Carter: How to Stay Calm During a Fight | Greater Good | Relationships | Scoop.it

The sociologist and bestselling author at UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center provides specific, research-tested tips for staying calm when fighting with someone we love.

Dr. Amy Fuller's insight:
This video provides info on the importance of staying calm when in conflict with neurological insight.   Tips include
  • Do a calming activity
  • Breathing
  • Humor
  • Narrate Intentions with mindfulness
Read Christine Carter’s full essay on How to Fight.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Amy Fuller from Counselling and More
Scoop.it!

Mindfulness and Neural Integration: Daniel Siegel, MD at TEDxStudioCityED

Daniel Siegel, MD, is Clinical Professor of psychiatry at UCLA, Co-Director of Mindful Awareness Research Center, Executive Director of Mindsight Institute, author, and recipient of numerous awards and honorary fellowships.

This talk examines how relationships and reflection support the development of resilience in children and serve as the basic '3 R's" of a new internal education of the mind.


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Dr. Amy Fuller's insight:

Very informative explaination of the brain and how it works to help us manage ourselves. 

more...
John Threadgold's comment, September 8, 2013 5:17 PM
very good video indeed. I offer a combination of Mindfulness and Focusing-Oriented Therapy to my clients, and those who embrace it, recover !
Rescooped by Dr. Amy Fuller from Momfulness
Scoop.it!

Mom’s love good for child’s brain | Washington University in St. Louis

Mom’s love good for child’s brain | Washington University in St. Louis | Relationships | Scoop.it

Mom's love good for Children's Brains

School-age children whose mothers nurtured them early in life have brains with a larger hippocampus, a key structure important to learning, memory and response to stress. 

The new research, by child psychiatrists and neuroscientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is the first to show that changes in this critical region of children’s brain anatomy are linked to a mother’s nurturing. 


Read Summary here. Read full text: Maternal support in early childhood predicts larger hippocampal volumes at school age

more...
Dr. Amy Fuller's curator insight, July 13, 2013 11:10 PM

The importance of maternal nurtuing has been long proven for rats and primates, and now we know that children who experience nurturing in their early years have a larger hippocampus, by 10%. This is actually a followup study on a study on depression in preschoolers when they were ages 3 to 5. Brain images of these same children were taken when they were between 7 and 10. They evaluated the degree of maternal nuturance when the children were younger and compared the results to the brain imaging. .  This  study suggests a clear link between nurturing and the size of the hippocampus. 

What's the hippocampus? One of the most important parts of the human brain especially since it sits right in the middle of our animal brain (limbic system) which is involved in managing emotion, threat detection, behavior, motivation and memory.  Amy Fuller PhD


Hat tip to Donald Cooper for posting this on the Achieve Balance Linked Group


Read Summary here. Read full text: Maternal support in early childhood predicts larger hippocampal volumes at school age

Curated by Dr. Amy Fuller
Dr. Amy Fuller, Marriage & Family Therapist passionate about healing & empowering a fuller life through Relational, Emotional, Mental & Spiritual Health/Growth. www.AmyFullerPhd.com